Help! I have a Pure Horse Crazy kid and I'm not sure what to do next!


Some quick answers to commonly asked questions. Please click on over to our blog for more detailed answers. If you don’t find an answer to your question, please contact us today!
  1. Does my child need lessons?
    Yes. That does not mean that you need to continue lessons forever, but if your child is a beginner, you need lessons once a week for at least six months (2 years is preferred). If your child wants to be a professional equestrian, you should continue lessons until adulthood.
  2. How much does owning a horse cost?
    It depends. If you have your own acreage, then your cost will generally be around $100-$300 per month, per horse. If you board your horse, your bill will average $300-$800 a month (depending on where you are located). There are several factors that affect the cost, including the size and health of the horse, pasture, size and scope of the stable and its riders, etc.
  3. How do I make sure my child is safe around horses?
    1. Make sure they always wear a helmet when they ride. 2. Have them take lessons from a trainer who is committed to safety. 3. Remember that horses have to always be handled correctly. Accidents happen when people are “just fooling around.” Some quick answers to commonly asked questions. Please click on over to our blog for more detailed answers. If you don’t find an answer to your question, please contact us today! (reworded the last sentence) Yes. That does not mean that you need to continue lessons forever, but if your child is a beginner, you need lessons once a week for at least six months (2 years is preferred). If your child wants to be a professional equestrian, you should continue lessons until adulthood. It depends. If you have your own acreage, then your cost will generally be around $100-$300 per month, per horse. If you board your horse, your bill will average $300-$800 a month (depending on where you are located). There are several factors that affect the cost, including the size and health of the horse, quantity and quality of accessible pasture, size and scope of the stable and its riders, etc. (made several changes, including spelling of affect) 1. Make sure they always wear a helmet when they ride. 2. Have them take lessons from a trainer who is committed to safety. 3. If you buy a horse, go for an older, well-trained horse over a younger, less-experienced horse 4. Remember that horses have to always be handled correctly. Accidents happen when people are “just fooling around.”
  4. I have a couple of acres, should I buy a horse for my child?
    Do not buy a horse until: 1. Your child has had a year of lessons. 2. Your child has fallen off a horse and continues to ride. 3. Your child is at an age that they are old enough and wise enough to treat the horse with respect at all times and help take care of it.
  5. How old does my child have to be to ride?
    Any age child can ride with help of an adult. The youngest age to start lessons is 4 or 5 depending on their interest level. Some instructors won't start children to they are closer till 8.
  6. How do I know if my child will stick with horses?
    1. Keep riding after a scary fall. 2. Clean stalls or ride when it is very hot or very cold. 3. Frequently choose horses over other things that they enjoy (going to a friend's house, other sports, the latest fashion trends, etc.)